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What if we were teaching history all wrong? Classes tend to treat it as a narrative, where A causes B causes C, and then eventually, maybe, you reach the present.

Why not frame history as a series of questions starting from where things are today and going backward in time? You could pick any aspect of today's world and trace its evolution back hundreds of years.

Wouldn't that be a great class? History would seem so much more relevant and connected to the now.

'setxkbmap us colemak ctrl:nocaps' sets up my X keyboard mapping from the command line, and took way too long to figure out

This is a lovely collection of historical source code, including ZIL code for many Infocom games! github.com/historicalsource?ta

pol, existential threat, rambling thread 

Trying to bootstrap my community again with friends and family. Let's see if it actually takes this time...

Enjoying this year's Advent of Code, both the puzzles and the silly story.

There's a creepy trend recently of toys that detect when they've been abandoned and make noise to "re-engage" the kid. My kids ignore them, but I'm mad that these companies are even trying. I just want to start jailbreaking all these toys.

Making really good coffee is 16 parts water, 1 part fresh ground beans, and 10 parts superstition.

I tried to explain maenad.itch.io/dying-in-space to my board game friends last night over beers. They were like, “So you collect points?”. No. “Then its about seeing who lives the longest?”. Not exactly. “Then how do you win?”.

What part of Dying in Space isn’t clear?

"A writer who works on the old system of production can spend days crafting a sentence, putting what feels like a worthy idea into language, only to find [...] that the internet has already produced countless sentences that are more or less just like it, even if these lack the same artisanal origin story that we imagine gives writing its soul. There is [...] no more place for writers and thinkers in our future than, since the 19th century, there has been for weavers."

jehsmith.com/1/2018/12/its-all

Most atheists only know about one religion well: the one they disowned. But they tend to make careless assumptions about the rest when they "oppose all religions equally". And since they are quite uninformed about other religions, they easily fall prey to bigoted narratives.

@fraggle I am amused at this Doom visual novel engine and its associated dating sim: forum.zdoom.org/viewtopic.php?

The best part of being boosted/favorited is getting to poke through the posts of new people! 😁

From twitter.com/sportsballcat/stat

You can say 'all are welcome', but if wolves and sheep are both welcome then you're only going to get wolves. The smart sheep will go somewhere else and the naive sheep will be eaten and processed. [...]
Refusing to choose is a choice. It's a choice in favor of the people who prey on others and who refuse to acknowledge the humanity of those they hate.

ponder on subcultures 

Me: What I mean is, there's a human need for .. emotional support humans.

Me at myself: *sighs* They're called friends, dearie.

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